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Eating Out & Eating Healthy

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"we're going to start with some mixed baby greens"

The executive chef at Winnie's Le Bus Restaurant is all about healthy, fresh ingredients, but not all his customers are.

"When you go out do you just get whatever you want or do you think healthy?"

"I guess it just depends what mood i'm in."

"Being absolutely healthy doesn't generally make me have a good time."

People have a lot of excuses for not eating healthy when they're out, but registered dietitian Joy Dubost who joined me at the restaurant says it's really not that difficult.

"Typically the number one mistake is that they over-consume."

Joy says some sure fire ways to make sure you don't over eat...

  • Skip the bread and butter before the meal.
  • Grilled, baked or broiled beat out fried foods any day.
  • Pay attention to the portions. That can be as easy as splitting your entrees and appetizers.


"That way you can try different things and share and therefore you are not consuming any one thing."

Beware of your beverages. Joy says they are an easy source of calories and can quickly add up.

"Depending on the size it can be anywhere from 150 to 300 calories."

Joy says this is what you want to load up on- fruits and vegetables. She says they are low in calories and high in nutrients and taste good.

Yes, get the dressing on the side, and watch what's on the salad- joy gives this one a thumbs up - asparagus, tomato, chicken and homemade grilled salsa.

"Some salads have more calories than a burger and fries because of all the ingredients they add."

Joy suggests choosing restaurants with healthy options.

Executive chef john o'brien says that is one of their top priorities.

"The one thing we try to stay away from is anything processed, we make our own salad dressings, our own soups... All fresh vegetables."

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