First New Year's Babies Born in The Tri-Cities - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

First New Year's Babies Born in The Tri-Cities

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RICHLAND, Wash. - The new year brings in many new beginnings. It can also bring in a new addition for a family.

The first baby born in the Tri-Cities came from the Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland just one minute into the new year at 12:01 a.m.

Dominik Bridger weighs six pounds and 15 ounces.

The first baby girl, Kaileigh Lancheros was born at 12:40 a.m. also born at Kadlec Regional Medical Center weighing six pounds and eight ounces.

Both sets of parents say they are proud to call their children, "New Year's Babies."

"We say you know, You were the first baby born in 2013 in the Tri-City area. It will be a cool thing to tell to him when he's old enough to understand it,"said Parents Brianna Rabe and Cory Bridger.

"We're very excited to have her in the new year and for her to be the first baby girl born. It's the best gift that we could have received this year,"said Parents Kelsey Lancheros and Victor Lancheros Jr.

Doctors say both babies were born naturally.

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