Coca-Cola is Joining the Fight Against Obesity - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Coca-Cola is Joining the Fight Against Obesity

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Many fast food restaurants are making changes to become a healthier option...

Now, one beverage giant is jumping on the bandwagon to fight obesity.

When you think of Coca-Cola, the word "health" doesn't usually come to mind, but it's working on changing that.

That's right. The global leader in the beverage industry is packing a punch in the fight against obesity.

Some may say it's a bold move from a brand you wouldn't expect, this two-minute long commercial, posted on Coca-Cola's website, will most likely intensify the debate over sodas and public health.

And for dietician Emily Wong-Swartz - it's important for children to see.

"We see a rise in type 2 diabetes which we associate with adults. I think it's great Coke is taking initiative."

Over 126 years, Coke has created more than 650 beverages. 180 of them have low and no calorie choices.

For some, average calories per serving have been reduced, there are smaller portion sizes, and the calories are labeled right there on the front of each can.

According to their new ad, the company has also made some changes in schools.

Wong-Swartz says teaching people at young age is key in the nation's fight against obesity.

"Often, we blame soda intake on obesity, however, schools have a role to play also in providing nutritional education to students."

The world's number 1 beverage company says the ad isn't a reaction to negative feelings, but instead, it's to raise awareness about what the company has done and the work it plans to do in coming months regarding obesity.

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