Remedies to Help Fight the Misery of Cold and Flu Season - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Remedies to Help Fight the Misery of Cold and Flu Season

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There are quite a few bugs going around this time of the year.

It's keeping medicine isles crowded at local supermarkets.

Vitamin C ... Airborne ... Nyquil... Cough drops...

All of the options can be overwhelming.

Coughing seems to be the sound of the season, the misery of cold and flu season.

It has us stocking up on all kinds of remedies ... With so many choices, it has us scratching our heads.

"You know there's lots of things that can and do take and vitamin c is one that does seem to help people and vitamin d is something that people are interested in taking that seems to make a difference."

Echinacea is also on the list - but there's conflicting scientific evidence about just what works for any given individual.

"Most of us have something that we feel like worked a little bit better."

"For sinus congestion - there's this the neti pot - it's been around for ages and now there is a modern twist you can get a neti pot in the can."

Rick Jones swears by them.

"It definitely gives you some temporary relief especially when you need it."

A lot of us are needing some relief.

And one more thing - yes grandma's soup does have healing power.

"Chicken soup is an example of a nutrient rich broth and it really feeds your immune system and it's hydrating it's also warm and it feels good."

For vegetarians miso soup is also a good bet.

Doctors also say to stay hydrated ...

And as always the best medical advice for you and your family comes from your doctor... Especially if you feel symptoms coming on.

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