One in Three Americans Doesn't Get a Good Night's Rest - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

One in Three Americans Doesn't Get a Good Night's Rest

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When's the last time you could vividly remember a dream? How about just waking up feeling rested?

For one in three working Americans, a good night's sleep is truly a dream and the sleep debt they're building up is dangerously unhealthy.

It's been three years since Billy Bertrand decided it was time to meet with sleep doctor, Jana Kaimal.

"Trouble sleeping, keeping people awake in the house." says Billy Bertrand

Bertrand got to know his couch pretty well in those days removing himself from the bedroom because the impact his sleep problems were having on his wife and kids.

"I was actually asleep, but thinking I was awake and I could hear everything going around me."

Bertrand would wake up feeling exhausted and dread the eight hours a day he spent on the road as a salesman.

Doctor Kaimal says sleep deprivation affects your weight, health, mood and productivity.

"They might not remember something they need to remember. Gradually your intellectual function deteriorates, your reaction time."

A sleep test helped pinpoint Bertrand's problems.

"You fall asleep and then they measure how many times you wake up in the middle of the night." says Bertrand.

Within the first hour of a sleep test he woke up over 30 times.

His diagnosis was two sleep disorders, something common for people who consistently wake up feeling exhausted.

"Most people need seven to eight hours of sleep, but most of them are getting less than six hours of sleep." says sleep specialist Dr. Jana Kaimal.

"When it comes to investing in your home, Sr. Kaimal says your bedroom is the most important room from your mattress to window coverings and the temperature, you want to make sure you have the ideal sleeping environment."

"A well insulated, well ventilated, cool room is what you need." says Dr. Kaimal.

Routine also helps keep your sleep rhythm in check, as does exercise.

"Exercise is activity. Those are the things that fix your sleep-wake clock and if the clock is proper, you are likely to sleep better." says Dr. Kaimal

Billy Bertrand has made changes to his routine and takes a daily medication to help him sleep soundly, something that has changed his quality of life.

"You feel like taking on the day. It's just been a godsend. All of the problems started disappearing."

limiting use of digital devices before bed can also help you get to sleep faster.

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