Overlooked Laundry Room Chemicals Dangerous for Small Children - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Overlooked Laundry Room Chemicals Dangerous for Small Children

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If you have small children, your laundry detergent could pose a real danger.

Pediatricians are warning parents and grandparents not to overlook the laundry room when it comes to keeping kids safe.

If you have small children, you probably have a set of child door locks on your kitchen cabinets and likely the bathroom drawers too.

But what about the laundry room?

Safety experts say even conscientious parents often underestimate the hazards laundry products pose to young kids.

From brightly colored liquids kids are tempted to taste, to spray bottles just waiting to be sprayed.

Pediatrician Dr. Deb Lonzer says "kids love spray bottles. So, if you have spray bottles make sure you put them somewhere where kids can't reach them. It would be best to lock them up like any other chemical."

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends storing all laundry products in their original packaging, and in a high locked cabinet. Not on top of the washer or dryer as most of us do.
That includes powdered detergents whose scoops remind children of sand toys.

And be especially careful with those popular detergent pods. In 2012, more than six thousand children in the U.S. became violently ill after chewing on or swallowing a detergent pod.

"Those pods are colorful and attractive and a baby, infant, toddler, a child of any age is going to look at that and say "hey, that kind of looks like a gummy something." and there's an opportunity to pop it in your mouth." says Dr. Lonzer.

The bottom line, treat laundry chemicals like you would any other dangerous substances and keep them locked away from curious kids.

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