Breastfeeding Mom: “I Was Asked To Go To A Back Room Or Outside” - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Breastfeeding Mom: “I Was Asked To Go To A Back Room Or Outside”

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SPOKANE, Wash – A Spokane mother says she was enjoying lunch with her family at a local eatery on Saturday, breastfeeding her baby, when a restaurant employee asked her to go to a back room or outside.

Sara Durso says she was shocked.

"I took a minute, but told her I have a legal right to breastfeed anywhere I'm otherwise legally allowed to be," Durso told KHQ. 

She says the employee then said it would still be nice if Durso would move.

The owner of that restaurant told KHQ off-camera the employee offered the back room to Durso, but never forced her to move, and added that they since apologized over the issue, the employee is now aware of Washington law, and that they've been harassed ever since the incident happened Saturday.

Durso said she's not out to ruin the business, but just wants people to know about breastfeeding laws.

Per Washington law, mothers are allowed to breastfeed "in any place of public resort, accommodation, assemblage, or amusement," (R RCW 49.60.030), and while there are no laws regarding whether a nursing mom has to be covered, she can not be cited for indecent exposure (RCW 9A.88.010).

At Manito Park Tuesday, other local mothers weighed in. 

"I breastfeed in church, I breastfeed in a restaurant, but I always cover myself up just for people around me, I don't want them to feel uncomfortable," Rebekah Davis told KHQ.

"I'm all for breastfeeding in public, I mean we eat in public, so why can't a baby?" Carrie Christiansen said.  "Some moms prefer to keep covered, some moms don't, I think it's just a personal choice."

And while Durso was not wearing a cover on Saturday, she says she was using an extra shirt, and that she was not exposed.  But the law doesn't require even that.

Durso told KHQ she did file a BBB complaint against the business, but also said she and her family do plan to go to back once this dust settles.

"I don't think it's anybody's business how I choose to feed my children," Durso said.  "And it's not any of my business how anybody else chooses to feed theirs."

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