Lipstick and Gloss Might Have Troubling Levels of Toxic Metals - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Lipstick and Gloss Might Have Troubling Levels of Toxic Metals

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An alarming new study suggests the lipstick and gloss that women use every day, may contain troubling levels of toxic metals.

These same metals are banned in the same beauty products in europe...

But here in the U.S. there are no standards for metal content in cosmetics.

Prior studies have found lead in lipstick, but this research from Berkeley's School of Public Health also found cadmium, chromium and aluminum in 32 of the brands tested.
     
The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics says there's really no way for consumers to protect themselves.

"No brand, no color to avoid... No simple how to tips..." says Margie Kelly from The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics.

Margie Kelly says there are plenty of reasons for women to be concerned.  These metals have been linked to cancers, heart disease, diabetes, and neurological problems.

Of course, that depends on how a woman uses lipsticks. Whether it's every day, numerous times a day, or just once in a while.
 
Scientists say it's what builds up in the human body over the long term that's worrisome.
 
"Shouldn't be lead and metals associated with any disease in our lipsticks..." says Margie Kelly

But Personal Care Products Council, a cosmetics industry group,  says this new report doesn't provide any meaningful information. The chief toxicologist says the finding of trace levels of metals in lip products is not unexpected given their natural presence in air, soil and water.

The council says very low levels are also found in drinking water and food, which still leaves watchdog groups with questions.

"The color additive process, it could be contaminated by a metal tube not sure... We're not sure, but we want to get to the bottom of it and we'd like to see a commitment to eliminating these metals from lipsticks." says Margie Kelly.

Consumer groups say women can choose to use lipstick and gloss only once in a while, but shouldn't have to worry that their beauty products aren't safe for frequent use.
   
One warning because lead is so dangerous to children, the campaign for safe cosmetics suggests they never be allowed to play with lipstick and gloss.

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