Bat Bites Baby in Pasco, Being Treated for Rabies - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Bat Bites Baby in Pasco, Being Treated for Rabies

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PASCO, Wash. - A word of warning from health officials after a bat tests positive for rabies in Pasco. An 11-month-old baby was bit by that bat and now that child and two other adults are undergoing rabies treatments.

All kinds of wildlife are on the move now that the weather's getting warmer. Bats will typically come out of the woodwork when the weather warms up or cools down. So, Saturday night when Dan and Sandra Anderson opened up a patio umbrella it wasn't surprising a few bats were hiding there.

But one of those bats landed on their granddaughter. Later they noticed bite marks on the little girl. The Benton Franklin Health District said the family did the right thing seeking treatment right away.

"It's a series of shots you get initially some rabies immunoglobulin, that's number one in the series, then you follow up three more times for the rest of the series," said Public Health Nurse Heather Hill. 

"We've had a couple of deaths from rabies in the state of washington back in the late 90's and both were bat rabies. They tracked them down. And neither one of them had experienced or reported a bite," said Environmental Health Specialist Rick Dawson.

Rabies is transmitted through saliva and doctors say it's a good idea to seek medical treatment if any child or someone unaware is around a bat because you just never know. Without treatment the disease can kill someone in a matter of weeks.
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