From Teal To Toe: Walking For Ovarian Cancer Research - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

From Teal To Toe: Walking For Ovarian Cancer Research

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RICHLAND, Wash.- People walk along the Columbia River in Richland all the time, but this weekend they can do it for a good cause.

Saturday at Howard Amon Park, the First Annual Teal To Toe walk will start at 11 a.m. Walkers can register at 10. The walk is a fundraiser to help fight ovarian cancer, the deadly disease that killed Julie Davis, a Tri-City native.

"The last two and a half months of her life, she spent in the hospital, she wanted to do something herself for research and just couldn't," said Julie's mother Maxine Martin. "That was the last thing she asked me to do when she was in the hospital."

Tri-Cities Ovarian Cancer Together, a new local organization, will host the walk. They say all funds raised will stay in state and go toward ovarian cancer research.

 For more information about the walk check out their website: www.ovariancancertogether.org

 

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