Stay Safe as Temperatures Start to Rise Across the Country - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Stay Safe as Temperatures Start to Rise Across the Country

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More than seven thousand people died from 1999 to 2009 from heat-related conditions.

As temperatures start to rise across the country experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are releasing new information about who is most likely to suffer complications during a heat wave.

Researchers say those most vulnerable to the heat are the elderly, children, people with pre-existing conditions and the poor.

Just last year, a rash of summer thunderstorms caused power outages in Maryland, Ohio, Virginia and West Virginia. Those storms were followed by a heat wave during which thirty-two people died. Most of those deaths occurred among elderly adults who lived alone in homes without air conditioning.

Experts say it is important to remember that heat can kill and you must take proper precautions.

To prevent heat-related illness and death you should stay hydrated, stay cool and stay informed of upcoming heat waves.

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