New Medical Center in Yakima Holds Groundbreaking Ceremony - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

New Medical Center in Yakima Holds Groundbreaking Ceremony

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YAKIMA, Wash. - A special new medical center for Alzheimer's, Dementia, and Parkinson's Disease will soon be under construction in Yakima.

This center has a unique focus, not just treating these conditions but actually repairing memory in those suffering.

"It's actually a place for rehabilitation for increasing memory, for increasing their ability to function," said Yakima family practitioner, Kent Vye.

The new Fieldstone Memory Care Center in Yakima will allow those suffering from those diseases to get the care they need.

"This is a place where families can bring loved their loved ones and it will be a setting where they will get care, continuous care, comprehensive care in a quality environment," Vye said.

On Friday the site held a ground breaking ceremony where doctors, builders, and community members came to see the progress already underway

"We started construction about four weeks ago and should be finished by May," said Doug Ellison with Project Partner.

One of the builders says this facility will be different than others in Yakima because it will work toward repairing memory, not just making people comfortable.

"Focused care on Alzheimer's dementia, it's not an after thought like an assisted living building," Ellison said.

Ellison also says it is an effort by locals for locals in Yakima, a community coming together.

"We're excited, we are all local here, our roots are here and we're excited about that," he said.

The new center will have many different areas and activities for those suffering from Alzheimer's, which will keep them active and their brain stimulated during their rehabilitation.

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