Fire Destroys Colville Tribal HQ In Nespelem - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

UPDATE: Fire Destroys Colville Tribal HQ In Nespelem

Posted: Updated:
Photo courtesy: Colville Tribal member Mary Vasquez Photo courtesy: Colville Tribal member Mary Vasquez

NESPELEM, Wash. (AP) - A Fire has destroyed the administration building for the Colville Indian reservation in Nespelem.
    
The chairman of the governing business council, Mike Finley, says the three-story building is a total loss.
    
Finley says there were no known injuries. No one was believed to be in the building when the fire broke out about 1 a.m. Monday, and there's no indication how it started. It's not related to a wildfire.
    
The building housed the business council and support staff for the Confederated Tribes Of The Colville Reservation. Nespelem is about five miles north of Grand Coulee Dam.
    
Finley says Colville tribal records were lost and services will be affected. The confederation has 12 tribes with 9,470 members and a 1.4 million reservation in northeast Washington.

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KHQ.COM - An administrative building for the Colville Confederated Tribes burned to the ground overnight in Nesepelem, Washington.

It's not clear at this hour how the fire started. No injuries have been reported. We'll post more details as we get them.

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