Is Your Camp Fire Legal? - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Is Your Camp Fire Legal?

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Photo courtesy: MGN Online Photo courtesy: MGN Online

KHQ.COM - Part of summer means enjoying s'mores around the campfire, but with the current hot, dry conditions, you're small campfire could start a much bigger fire…the kind you don't want. Fire restrictions are therefore in place right now in Spokane County. 

Violating those restrictions and lighting the wrong kind of campfire could cost you thousands of dollars in fines and even land you in jail.

If you don't follow the restrictions in place, you could pay the price. Jones tells me you can face a civil infraction in the City of up to $513. In the County, you can pay up to a thousand dollars, even be criminally charged and face up to 90 days in jail.

The Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency also has authority to fine, anywhere between $200 and $2000. 

Finally, the biggest cost could come if you actually start a fire and you're forced to pay fire-fighting costs. The fire pits that are currently allowed under outdoor burning restrictions can be complicated, even according to Jones. However, the Spokane Fire Department's website gives a good idea of what is and is not allowed. 

View it here: http://www.spokanefire.org/Documents/2013_firerestrictions.pdf.  For further questions, Jones recommends you call her office at 625 – 7000.

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