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Officials: Gunman Treated For Mental Health Issues

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WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. law enforcement officials are telling The Associated Press that the Navy contractor identified as the gunman in the mass shootings at the Washington Navy Yard had been suffering a host of serious mental issues, including paranoia and a sleep disorder. He also had been hearing voices in his head, the officials said.
    
Aaron Alexis, 34, had been treated since August by the Veterans Administration for his mental problems, the officials said. They spoke on condition of anonymity because the criminal investigation in the case was continuing. The Navy had not declared him mentally unfit, which would have rescinded a security clearance that Alexis had from his earlier time in the Navy Reserves.
    
Family members told investigators that Alexis was being treated for his mental issues.

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    Tuesday, July 25 2017 12:39 PM EDT2017-07-25 16:39:13 GMT

    CHICAGO - Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease in nearly all of them, from athletes in the NFL down to high school. It's the biggest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (ehn-sehf-uh-LAH'-puh-thee), or CTE. The disease has been linked to repeated head blows and the results confirm that it can happen even in young players. 

    More >>

    CHICAGO - Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease in nearly all of them, from athletes in the NFL down to high school. It's the biggest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (ehn-sehf-uh-LAH'-puh-thee), or CTE. The disease has been linked to repeated head blows and the results confirm that it can happen even in young players. 

    More >>
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    Tuesday, July 25 2017 12:31 PM EDT2017-07-25 16:31:12 GMT

    NEW YORK - An activist investor has bought a "meaningful" stake in Barnes & Noble Inc. and is urging the bookseller to sell itself. Sandell Asset Management Corp. CEO Thomas E. Sandell, in a letter to Barnes & Noble's board, said "the public market for retail stocks is contributing to a risky and inhospitable environment" and the company would be better served if it were private or part of a larger company.

    More >>

    NEW YORK - An activist investor has bought a "meaningful" stake in Barnes & Noble Inc. and is urging the bookseller to sell itself. Sandell Asset Management Corp. CEO Thomas E. Sandell, in a letter to Barnes & Noble's board, said "the public market for retail stocks is contributing to a risky and inhospitable environment" and the company would be better served if it were private or part of a larger company.

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