US Survey: More than 1 in 10 Kids has ADHD - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

US Survey: More than 1 in 10 Kids has ADHD

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KENNEWICK, WA - A new report from the Centers for Disease Control claims that one in ten kids is diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. 

"My eight-year-old son was having difficulty in school. I took him in to find out and they diagnosed him with ADHD and they told me, you know, that's usually inherited," said Dr. Richard Ostrom.

That was in the 1990's. He found out he did, in fact, pass it on to his son.

"It's a condition that makes it difficult for them to stay focused, pay attention, to, you know, function on a level that's expected in school and other social situations," said another local psychologist, Dr. Kenneth Cole.

Now, Dr. Ostrom uses his own struggles to help other people like him. According to the CDC, doctors are diagnosing more kids than ever with ADHD. A topic mired in controversy.

"I won't say there's a lot of misdiagnosis. That's happening less frequently as we're getting more sophisticated," said Dr. Ostrom.

"It's hard to know if more children are developing the condition or whether we're more sophisticated and maybe more prone to applying that label," said Dr. Cole.

"The children who struggle with just the attention pieces are often missed because it looks as if they're not exerting effort or they're being lazy and those labels are often used and can be really detrimental and harmful to the child's sense of self," said another psychologist, Dr. Megan Hemmerel.

We're told medications are only prescribed for ADHD on a case-by-case diagnosis.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE

ATLANTA - Health officials say the number of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder continues to rise.  The latest survey says more than 1 in 10 children has been diagnosed with ADHD.

ADHD has been increasing for at least 15 years.   Experts think that's because more doctors are looking for ADHD, and more parents know about it, but the new survey suggests the increase may be leveling off a little.

The numbers come from a 2011 survey of parents with children ages 4 to 17 done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A 2007 survey found 9.5% of kids had been diagnosed with ADHD.  The condition makes it hard for kids to pay attention and control impulsive behaviors.

 

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