NTSB: No Anomalies Found In NYC Train Brake System - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

NTSB: No Anomalies Found In NYC Train Brake System

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Investigators looking into a deadly New York City train derailment say no anomalies have been found with the train's brake system. Investigators looking into a deadly New York City train derailment say no anomalies have been found with the train's brake system.

NEW YORK (AP) - Investigators looking into a deadly New York City train derailment say no anomalies have been found with the train's brake system.
    
The Metro-North Railroad commuter train was traveling Sunday at 82 mph as it approached a 30 mph zone and jumped the tracks along a sharp curve. Four passengers died.
    
The National Transportation Safety Board says investigators haven't found any evidence of brake trouble during the train's nine previous stops and no problems with track signals. NTSB member Earl Weener said Tuesday there were "no anomalies."
    
The rail employees union says veteran engineer William Rockefeller was injured in the wreck and has cooperated with investigators. It says the NTSB investigation will show "there was no criminal intent with the operation of his train."
    
But Gov. Andrew Cuomo (KWOH'-moh) has said Rockefeller should be disciplined for "unjustifiable" speed.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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