New Kadlec ER Treats Double Expected Numbers - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

New Kadlec ER Treats Double Expected Numbers

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Kadlec Regional Medical Center's new stand-alone emergency room in Kennewick opened in June and it's already seen nearly 11,000 patients. Kadlec Regional Medical Center's new stand-alone emergency room in Kennewick opened in June and it's already seen nearly 11,000 patients.

KENNEWICK, WA - The demand for medical care continues to grow in the Tri-Cities and local hospitals are expanding to keep up.

Kadlec Regional Medical Center's new stand-alone emergency room in Kennewick opened in June and it's already seen nearly 11,000 patients.

They only expected to see around 6,000 the end of 2013.

The hospital attributes the high numbers to the growing demand for medical services in the area.

Kadlec built the Kennewick ER because 20% of their ER patients who used their Richland facility were showing up from Kennewick and others were driving up from Oregon.

Kadlec says the location in the expanding Southridge area is an ideal spot for the emergency room to serve as many people as possible.

"The ability to meet patients needs, I think the demand for services, the population growth of the Tri-Cities have coupled to see the popularity of the free standing ER," said Jim Hall, Kadlec spokesperson.

Hall says the free-standing ER allows the doctors to more efficiently help people.

Doctors say, on average, a patient gets treated and back out the door in under 90 minutes.

The new facility records also show a patient is typically seen by a doctor within eight minutes.

December saw the highest number of patients with 2,000 served.

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