Hispanic Community Getting More Help with Autism - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Hispanic Community Getting More Help with Autism but More is Needed in Some Areas

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Autism is a growing concern across the country and here in our area. But according to a study by the Oregon Health and Science University kids in the Latino community are diagnosed 2 and a half years later than non-minority kids. Autism is a growing concern across the country and here in our area. But according to a study by the Oregon Health and Science University kids in the Latino community are diagnosed 2 and a half years later than non-minority kids.
NBCRightNow.com - Autism is a growing concern across the country and here in our area. But according to a study by the Oregon Health and Science University kids in the Latino community are diagnosed 2 and a half years later than non-minority kids. 

Bonnie Garza's journey since her almost three year old son was born has seen a lot of road blocks. 

"It's been really a long journey but I'm determined to do what's best for him and get him the right help to  make him achieve a goal in life," said Gaza.

Garza lives in Hermiston and is having a hard time finding resources and support.
   
"I've had him in early education and developmental delay program and basically that's all there is in Hermiston," she added. 

Research in 2012 showed only one in 10 pediatricians offered recommended screenings for autism in Spanish, that is in California.

"Our culture is more closed, we're not open like different people so it's changed a lot," said Maria Ramos. 

Ramos also has a son with a developmental disability and found the Arc of Tri-Cities almost 20 years ago.
   
When Ramos first started holding meetings in Spanish there, she had about six families show up now she has more than 40. 
    
"It was really hard even finding a parent support group in Spanish it's really hard, actually they didn't have it here in the Tri-Cities," said Maria, another mother of two children with autism. 

While support is growing in the Tri-Cities, Garza's still working to gather support in the Umatilla area.

"It's frustrating because why can't they offer these programs? Is it because of funding? Is it because no one's opened up and spoken up about these situations?" concluded Garza.

Garza has started a Facebook page to rally support in the Umatilla area, and she's looking to start a group for kids and parents. 
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