Carbon Monoxide Alarm Placement Can Save Lives - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Carbon Monoxide Alarm Placement Can Save Lives

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A carbon monoxide alarm in your home could save your life and it's now required under state law, but many people don't know the best place to put the device. A carbon monoxide alarm in your home could save your life and it's now required under state law, but many people don't know the best place to put the device.

KENNEWICK, WA - A carbon monoxide alarm in your home could save your life and it's now required under state law, but many people don't know the best place to put the device.

Fire marshals tell NBC Right Now the best place to put a carbon monoxide alarm is at about eye level on a wall near your bedroom. The colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas can come from several different sources so mid-level is the safest.

The potentially deadly gas will eventually rise to the ceiling, but placing the alarm next to your ceiling smoke detector isn't the best option when the CO gas could be noticed sooner at a lower level. The gas often harms people the most in their sleep when they're not aware of some of the early symptoms like headaches.

A CO alarm placed near a bedroom will alert people the soonest.

"Mid-level is about the best protection you can have, but it can change and that's why we'll see some out there that are installed at lower levels, so that are high. The bottom line is that having a carbon monoxide detector at either of those levels is going to pick up dangerous levels so the important part is have that device," said Fire Marshal Mark Yaden, Kennewick Fire Department.

Washington state law requires carbon monoxide alarms in all apartments, condominiums, hotels, and new homes.

That law is one year old this month and Yaden says the increased awareness is protecting more people from the easily avoidable health hazard.

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