Newsman Tom Brokaw battling blood cancer - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Newsman Tom Brokaw battling blood cancer

Updated: Feb 12, 2014 09:49 AM
© iStockphoto / Thinkstock © iStockphoto / Thinkstock
  • HealthMore>>

  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>

TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Tom Brokaw, one of the most respected journalists in television news, is battling a type of cancer that attacks white blood cells in bone marrow, NBC News announced Tuesday evening.

The long-time anchor of "NBC Nightly News," the 74-year-old Brokaw has been working as a special correspondent contributing to the network's coverage of the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

First diagnosed last summer at the Mayo Clinic, Brokaw's doctors feel he has made good progress against the cancer, known as multiple myeloma, the network said.

Although there is no cure for the disease, which typically strikes people 60 and older, there are several treatment options, according to the Mayo Clinic. The treatments can include chemotherapy and other anti-cancer drugs, corticosteroids, stem cell transplantation and radiation. Bone pain and fatigue are common symptoms of the disease.

Treatments can often help patients return to near-normal activity, according to the Mayo Clinic.

In a personal statement released by NBC News, Brokaw said: "With the exceptional support of my family, medical team and friends, I am very optimistic about the future and look forward to continuing my life, my work and adventures still to come. I remain the luckiest guy I know. I am very grateful for the interest in my condition, but I also hope everyone understands I wish to keep this a private matter."

Brokaw's career with NBC News began in 1966, when he worked in the network's Los Angeles bureau. After a tenure as White House correspondent during the Watergate scandal in the 1970s, he was named anchor of "NBC Nightly News" in 1983. Brian Williams succeeded him as anchor in 2004.

The author of several books, perhaps his most famous is "The Greatest Generation," in which he examined the struggles and strengths of the generation of Americans who came of age during the Great Depression and World War II.

More information

To learn more about multiple myeloma, visit the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KHQ. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.