Inslee Death Penalty Moratorium Won't Affect Current Death Row - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Inslee Death Penalty Moratorium Won't Affect Current Death Row or Prosecutors

Posted: Updated:
Governor Jay Inslee announced Tuesday he's placing a moratorium on the death penalty in Washington. Governor Jay Inslee announced Tuesday he's placing a moratorium on the death penalty in Washington.

KENNEWICK, WA - Governor Jay Inslee announced Tuesday he's placing a moratorium on the death penalty in Washington.

The moratorium will prevent executions while Inslee is in office, but it won't change much about how the death penalty is used in Washington state now.

Some believe an eye for an eye makes the world go blind, but others think criminals who commit terrible crimes should pay for it with their life.

Governor Inslee made an executive decision Tuesday that the death penalty will not happen under his watch.

Many people are debating if the governor should've asked for more input first.

"The governor probably should've done a better job in getting information before he made this decision on the moratorium and I'm not sure it accomplishes much," said Andy Miller, Benton County Prosecuting Attorney.

The moratorium only prevents executions during his term, but doesn't pardon the nine people on death row in our state and none of those inmates are close enough to their execution date that they'd likely be executed while Inslee is in office.

And prosecutors can still follow the law and charge someone with the death penalty during the moratorium.

"If there was a murder that happened tomorrow that was a capital murder, a case that deserved the death penalty, I would still file the death penalty," Miller said.

Miller suggests that more review is needed by the legislature and should include more input from victims.

People NBC Right Now spoke with thought the moratorium deserved a debate, not an executive order.

"Should've been some sort of consensus from either just the general public or from the state legislature or somebody that really could've had a voice in it as opposed to him just doing what he did," said David Wilson.

"People might deserve it, but at the same time sometimes people deserve a second chance," said Gene Taylor.

"He should listen to the people of Washington state rather than use his own personal beliefs," said Brad Tapani.

Miller says it typically takes 10 to 15 years for a death penalty case to go from crime to execution. So Inslee may be out of office by the time anybody reaches their execution date.

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KHQ. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.