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Reward Offered For Info Leading To Apprehension Of Ten Most Wanted Fugitives

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FBI's Most Wanted Fugitives FBI's Most Wanted Fugitives
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KHQ.COM - The FBI is offering rewards for information leading to the apprehension of the Ten Most Wanted Fugitives. The slideshow contains current and historical information for internal and external distribution. This information is based on FBI records and is updated by the Investigative Publicity and Public Affairs Unit, Office of Public Affairs.The FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted Fugitives” list has been in existence since March 14, 1950. A reporter for the International News Service (the predecessor to United Press International) asked the Bureau for the names and descriptions of the “toughest guys” the Bureau would like to capture. The resulting story generated so much publicity and had so much appeal that late FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover implemented the “Ten Most Wanted Fugitives” program. The first person to be placed on the list was Thomas James Holden, wanted for the murder of his wife, her brother, and her stepbrother.

Since its inception, 500 fugitives have been on the “Top Ten” list, and 470 have been apprehended or located. Some interesting facts about the program are:

156 fugitives have been captured/located as a result of citizen cooperation.Two fugitives were apprehended as a result of visitors on an FBI tour.The shortest amount of time spent on the “Top Ten” list was two hours, by Billy Austin Bryant in 1969.The person who has spent the longest amount of time on the list is Victor Manuel Gerena.Nine fugitives were arrested prior to publication and release, but are still considered as officially on the list.The oldest person to be placed on the list was 69-year-old James J. Bulger, who was added in August of 1999. This program relies heavily on the assistance of citizens and the media. Publicity from coast to coast and around the world is important.


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