Better Education Leads to Fewer Baby SIDS Deaths - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Better Education Leads to Fewer Baby SIDS Deaths

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Whenever a baby dies, it's a tragedy. But new data shows that fewer babies are dying from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS. Whenever a baby dies, it's a tragedy. But new data shows that fewer babies are dying from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS.

KENNEWICK, WA - Whenever a baby dies, it's a tragedy. But new data shows that fewer babies are dying from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS. 

The county coroners believe that is thanks, in part, to better education at local hospitals.

Baby Dean Boogerd was born on Thursday and on Friday he got to go home. However, not before a Registered Nurse explained to his mom and dad how to avoid a tragedy.

"Even like stuffed animals, don't have them near his face," said Amy Mainwaring, RN.

Jenna Boogerd listened intently even though she's done all of this before.

"A lot of parents don't know. I mean, even myself being a mom five years ago to now, things have changed and I wouldn't know, you know, from the pediatric perspective or anything like that unless they told me," said Boogerd.

"A lot of times I'll try to give instruction to family members while they're there as well because what one person doesn't absorb, sometimes another person will absorb it. The more people that know the information, hopefully the safer the child will be," said Mainwaring.

Boogerd's something of a baby expert herself. She runs the popular Swanky Babies store in Kennewick. She said the SIDS education is invaluable.


"It's nice to hear it from a medical perspective just because I hear it from a retail perspective, you know, based off laws and regulations but having the medical side of it, there's a lot more to it," said Boogerd.

"We used to have a fair number that would come in through the ER which of course is tragic and heartbreaking, but thankfully we don't hear a lot of it anymore," said Mainwaring.

It's also believed that the coroners and medical examiners are getting better at diagnosing SIDS. They can tell whether a child's heart or brain stopped functioning first and if it isn't a death by suffocation, it likely is SIDS which there is no medical explanation for.

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