EMOTIONAL INTERVIEW: Michelle Knight Walks Savannah Guthrie Thro - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

EMOTIONAL INTERVIEW: Michelle Knight Walks Savannah Guthrie Through Torture She Endured In Ariel Castro's Home

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KHQ.COM - Sunday night, Dateline NBC aired an in-depth interview with Michelle Knight, one of the three women trapped inside Ariel Castro's Cleveland home for ten years after being kidnapped. All three women endured severe sexual and physical abuse and were even starved.

Michelle walked Savannah Guthrie through a model of Castro’s home and describes the relentless abuse she suffered for more than a decade. When Michelle Knight was rescued by police, she weighed only 86 pounds. 

Michelle Knight has now changed her name to "Lily," her favorite flower to represent the new beginning she now has.

Tuesday, May 6th, marks one year since the three women were discovered and rescued. In that year, Knight has been eager to share who story of survival and has appeared on Dr. Phil as well as Dateline.

She is also about to release her first book that describes her experience. The book is called, "Finding Me" and will be on sale May 6th.

Knight is now living on her own and taking cooking classes in hope of becoming a chef one day.

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