Best-Paid State Employees In Washington Released - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Best-Paid State Employees In Washington Released

SEATTLE (AP) - No real surprise: The football coaches at the University of Washington and Washington State University were the best paid state employees in 2013.

UW Coach Steve Sarkisian earned over $2.6 million in 2013. WSU coach Mike Leach earned over $2.3 million.

New state salary data was posted online Monday by the state Office of Financial Management.

The top-paid state employee who isn't a football or basketball coach is UW athletic director Scott Woodward, who earned just over $690,000 last year.

Next on the list is retiring WSU President Elson Floyd. Then comes Keith Ferguson, chief investment officer of the University of Washington.

The president of the University of Washington, Michael Young, doesn't appear on the top salary list until No. 14. His predecessor was not only one of the top state earners in Washington but also a top paid college president in the nation.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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