Obama: Airstrikes have destroyed arms, equipment - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Obama: Airstrikes have destroyed arms, equipment

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WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama says U.S. airstrikes in Iraq have succeeded in destroying arms and equipment that could have been used against the Kurdish capital of Irbil.

He says humanitarian efforts continue to airdrop food and water to persecuted religious minorities stranded on a mountaintop, and he says planning is underway for how to get them down.

Obama wouldn't give a timetable for how long the U.S. military involvement would last, saying it depends on Iraqi political efforts. But he did say, "I think this is going to take some time." He said, "I don't think we are going to solve this problem in weeks."

Obama also says the advance of the Islamic State forces was more rapid than anticipated.

Obama made his comments on the South Lawn of the White House Saturday, just before boarding Marine One for his summer vacation in Massachusetts.

To watch the entire press conference, click the link below:

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/iraq-turmoil/obama-warns-long-term-project-iraq-n176741

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