Suicide Prevention Week Aims to Raise Awareness That Suicide is - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Suicide Prevention Week Aims to Raise Awareness That Suicide is Avoidable

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This week is Suicide Prevention Week, it aims to raise awareness that suicide is avoidable. This week is Suicide Prevention Week, it aims to raise awareness that suicide is avoidable.
NBCRightNow.com - A National movement is shedding light on an issue that is causing growing concerns across the nation and here in our communities.

This week is Suicide Prevention Week, it aims to raise awareness that suicide is avoidable. 

Death by suicide is the 8th leading cause of death in Washington state and the second leading cause of death among people 15 to 24-years-old. 

But, there is hope and that is the message the Benton Franklin Suicide Prevention Coalition and the Youth Suicide Prevention Program is trying to spread.

"It's important that we talk about suicide because when we talk about it we can save lives, it's the silence and the stigma that surrounds it that makes it so," Kristi Haynes, Youth Suicide Prevention Program Trainer said. 

So far this year, family members and friends have lost at least 8 people to suicide in Benton and Franklin counties.

The Health Department says on average three people in the state die by suicide each day and with every one suicide, there are about 25 suicide attempts. 

"Start talking about it, admitting to other people when we're dealing with mental health issues and sharing that with others and asking people how they're feeling, those kinds of things help us to start talking about it and breaking the stigma," Haynes explained. 

The Benton County Jail has been dealing with the issue too, according to their daily briefing, right now they have five inmates on mental health watch.

Jail officials say they follow national jail procedures to make sure their inmates stay safe.

And based on the inmate's mental health conditions and statements and actions, they make decisions about their observation level. 

Experts say if you notice someone is depressed for longer than two weeks, they could be at risk.

"Also if someone is talking a lot about death or dying, 80 percent of the people who commit suicide talk about it before so we want to take those warnings seriously," Haynes concluded. 

If you need someone to talk to about suicide, you can call the suicide hotline at 1-800-273-8255.

There is also an awareness event this weekend.

The Walk About to Talk About Suicide Prevention event happens Saturday at 10:30 a.m. starting at the Outback Steakhouse on Canal Drive in Kennewick.
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