Several Americans hurt in Brussels attacks, no U.S. deaths repor - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Several Americans hurt in Brussels attacks, no U.S. deaths reported

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Flowers and candles are seen at Beursplein Square following three bomb blasts on March 22, 2016, in Brussels, Belgium / Getty Images Flowers and candles are seen at Beursplein Square following three bomb blasts on March 22, 2016, in Brussels, Belgium / Getty Images

SALT LAKE CITY  - Several Americans including a U.S. service member, his family and three Mormon missionaries are among dozens hurt in a series of deadly blasts that rocked a subway station and international airport in Belgium's capital city Tuesday morning.

A U.S. service member and four members of his family were among the Americans injured, NBC News reported, citing military officials. Their identities have not been released, but one official said their injuries are not believed to be life-threatening.

According to The Associated Press, an Air Force officer, his wife and four children hurt at the airport. It's not clear if the Air Force officer is the same service member mentioned in NBC News' report.

The family of a Mormon missionary from Utah who was seriously wounded in an attack on the Brussels airport says he suffered burns and shrapnel injuries but is recovering after surgery.
    
Court and Amber Empey say their son, Joseph Empey, is doing well after being treated for second-degree burns to his hands, face and head. They say he has come out of surgery Tuesday for shrapnel injuries to his legs.
    
The family said in a statement that the 20-year-old is grateful and in good spirits.
    
He was at the airport with 66-year-old Richard Norby and 19-year-old Mason Wells when they were wounded by an explosion. All three are from Utah and have been hospitalized.
    
A fourth missionary from France was in a different location at the airport and was hospitalized with minor injuries.

Tributes around the world show solidarity for Brussels

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh  Johnson says there is no "specific, credible intelligence" of any plots against the United States like those carried out in Brussels.
    
As a precaution, the Homeland Security Department is stepping up security at major U.S. airports and rail and transit stations around the country.
    
Johnson says DHS officials are in contact with their European counterparts and monitoring the ongoing situation.
    
Security officials are also reviewing whether additional screening may be necessary for air travelers coming from Belgium. Belgium is one of 38 countries whose citizens generally do not need a visa to visit the U.S.
    
Bombs were set off at the main airport and a subway station in Brussels Tuesday morning. At least 30 people were killed and hundreds more were wounded in the attacks.

NBC News and AP contributed to this story.

    

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