Jury hears opening statements in former Pasco officer's rape and - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Jury hears opening statements in former Pasco officer's rape and assault trial

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PASCO, WA - A former Pasco Police officer's rape and assault trial is underway in a Franklin County courtroom with opening statements. Then the alleged victim took the stand as the first witness.

Richard Aguirre faced family, friends and former colleagues as a family member told her side of what happened on a cold November night last year. We left out the more graphic details in the woman's emotional testimony. 

"I heard a ripping noise and plastic, so at that point I thought he wasn't going to stop," said the alleged victim.

She claims it happened after a night of heavy drinking around the Tri-Cities - from dinner to two bars and finally back to Aguirre's Pasco home. 

"She wakes him up with her hand, his face asking who are you. He says I told her it was uncle jay. He's going to tell you all that. He told the police that. Think about that. He had no obligation to go down there [to the police station]. He walks in to tell the story, he has no problem telling the story," said defense attorney Michael Lee.

The defense latched on to the heavy drinking bit, pointing out the victim is barely 105 pounds and admittedly drank eight alcoholic beverages that night. More evidence, including DNA evidence from the victim's underwear, will be brought up in court in the coming days.

The trial isn't expected to last long. Aguirre resigned from the Pasco Police Department in April. He is also facing a murder charge out of Spokane. Police there say DNA evidence linked Aguirre to what had been a cold case from 1986.

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