Local students dress like dead people: the reason why could save - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Local students dress like dead people: the reason why could save a life

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KENNEWICK, WA - The last thing anybody would expect to see walking down the halls of a high school is a Grim Reaper, but it happened today. It's part of an annual event called "Every 15 Minutes." Reporter Jaclyn Selesky talked with some Southridge High School students today to find out how this brings awareness to the dangers of drinking and driving.

It's a powerful program encouraging high school students not to drink and drive. Twin sisters Reagan and Paige Rebstock lost their older sister in a fatal car accident, which is why they find it so important to share their story with their classmates on what the consequences of one bad choice can be.

"We have had that experience mourning a loss," said Reagan, "and that does play into effect also because we know what people have to go through."

The program is geared towards seniors getting ready to leave the nest and go off to college, where unfortunately the temptation to drink and drive is much higher, which is why the twins want to make sure their peers understand the magnitude of getting behind the wheel impaired.

"You have to really be big thinkers and make sure that you take everyone's life into account, you take everyone's family, you're affecting really a whole community if you do make that decision to drink and drive," Reagan said. 

This program has been going on for more than 20 years now, and it seems to be working. Although it's called "Every 15 Minutes," that number has changed to every 53 minutes. This is good news, because it means that the frequency of drinking and driving accidents has gone down.

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