New distracted driving law stats are in - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

New distracted driving law stats are in

Posted: Updated:

WASHINGTON - It has been nearly two weeks since the new distracted driving law went into effect.

WSP ran stats to see how the first week of the law differed from the week before the law went into effect.

The Distracted While Under the Influence of Electronics law took effect on July 23, 2017. From Sunday July 23 to Saturday July 29, troopers contacted this many motorists for violating the new distracted driving law:

Contacts  337

Citations 27

Written warnings 4

Verbal warnings 306

During the previous week of Sunday July 16 to Saturday July 22, troopers stopped this number of cell phone violators:

Contacts 273

Citations 118

Written warnings  0

Verbal warnings 155

In 2016 the Washington State Patrol Troopers enforced both the cell phone handheld and cell phone texting laws. Both laws were replaced by the current law. Here are 2016 statistics:

Contacts 16,884

Citations 7,941

Written Warnings 114

Verbal Warnings 8,805

The Washington State Patrol is currently running a six-month “grace” period. Basically meaning troopers are looking to educate more drivers on the new law, not ticket them. However, it’s important to remember just because they will be in the “grace” period until January, doesn’t mean drivers get a free pass. If troopers observe distracted driving violations coupled with other dangerous driving behaviors, or if you’ve already received a warning about the new law, you run the risk of getting a ticket.

According to the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, fatalities in Washington State caused by distracted driving increased 32% from 2014-2015.

WSP knows a lot of people – both Washingtonians and those traveling through the state – know about the new law. Last month they published a few articles to help drivers better understand how this will impact them. You can find those links here: New Distracted Driving Law: Q&A and New Distracted Driving Law: Primary vs. Secondary Offenses.

HD DOPPLER 6i
/