New mother who accidentally smothered baby sues Portland hospita - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

New mother who accidentally smothered baby sues Portland hospital for $8.6 mil

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PORTLAND, Ore. -

A first-time mother in Portland is suing the hospital she gave birth in for $8.6 million, saying they left the newborn with her unattended after giving her pain killers and sleep aids. 

The lawsuit, filed last week, claims that Portland Adventist Medical Center is at fault for the death of Monica Thompson's 10-day-old son, Jacob. 

The lawsuit says Jacob was born via C-section and was a healthy baby boy with no conditions. Three days after his birth, he was taken to a nursery so his mother could rest and be discharged. The lawsuit says the hospital gave Thompson "a combination of narcotic pain killers and sleep aids" at around midnight, and then brought Jacob back in three hours later so Thompson could breastfeed him. 

“About an hour later, still drowsy and groggy, Mrs. Thompson noticed her son was unresponsive in her arms,” the lawsuit states.

She called for a nurse while she tried to get him to respond," the suit said. "Mrs. Thompson tried to stimulate her son's suckling reflexes without success. She touched his eyes and got no response. She poked him and talked to him with no reaction. When no nurse came to help, Mrs. Thompson carried her son to the hallway and frantically yelled for help."

Jacob was placed on life support and was pronounced dead at ten days old. 

Doctors determined that Jacob suffered "severe hypoxia" or oxygen deficiency, "and his brain was severely and permanently damaged."

The lawsuit, seeking $8.6 million, says the hospital was negligent for medicating Thompson, putting Jacob in bed with her without supervision, and not having clear policies on the dangers that the combination could create. 

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