Survey: Are Alcohol Ads Targeting Children? - NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |

Survey: Are Alcohol Ads Targeting Children?

Parents and teens are being asked to download and print out a survey to complete while watching Super Bowl XLI on Sunday.  The survey is to evaluate and rate all commercial ads that are advertising alcohol and to rate who the commercials are targetting.

Download in PDF or Microsoft Word

Once the form has been filled out, please mail them to the following address by Feb. 16th.

P.O. Box 45330
Olympia, WA

Results of the survery will be shared with the public after the study has been conducted.

OLYMPIA, Wash. - With a large audience viewing in to the Super Bowl every year, commercials have become a high light on it's own and drawing its own hype.

The Washington State Coalition to Reduce Underage Drinking and Lt. Gov. Brad Owen are asking Washington residents to pay a little more attention between quarters and to be on the lookout for commercials that may be targetting children to drink alcohol.

"We're very interested in knowing which advertisements have the most appeal to minors," said Owen. "We all know that teen drinking has tragic and often devastating results, and the industry has been told time and time again that their consumer messages should not be targeted toward this highly impressionable age group."

In 2005 the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth studied 154,000 alcohol ads aired in each of the three largest media markets in Washington State.  They concluded that 22 percent of the ads were more likely to be seen by youth ages 12 to 20 than by adults.

Parents and teens are being urged to complete and assessment tool during the Sunday game and evaluate each of the alcohol related ads.  The survey also gives a chance for viewers to express their opinions on how they feel the commercials are working and who they are targetting.

"We also hope that parents will take the time to have a conversation about the commercials in the context of helping their kids understand why alcohol can be so harmful when abused, especially by teens," the lieutenant governor said.

According to federal reports, kids who drink before age 15 are five times more likely to develop alcohol problems when they are adults. Numerous studies show that parents' influence and actions are crucial to a child's decision not to drink.

Millions of follars are spent by alcohol industries to promote their products and reaching millions of viewers with their messages.  Of the nine commercials promoting alcohol products aired during Super Bowl XL in 2006 (Seattle Seahawks v. Pittsburgh Steelers), six made the "top 10" ranking as listed by USA Today.

"Many of these commercials are designed to be cute and funny," Owen said. "We are hoping that kids simply ignore these advertisements but we are certain that won't happen. We are simply using this as yet one more opportunity to promote the notion of responsible advertising by the industry - and hopefully save some lives in the process."